Posts Tagged: Justin Taylor

In Conversation with Justin Taylor

Justin Taylor arrived in superlative form on the lit horizon with the February 2010 release of a story collection, Everything Here is the Best Thing Ever—not all that long after appearing one day in front of Electric Lit’s table at

In Conversation with Justin Taylor

Justin Taylor arrived in superlative form on the lit horizon with the February 2010 release of a story collection, Everything Here is the Best Thing Ever—not all that long after appearing one day in front of Electric Lit’s table at

JUSTIN TAYLOR

Once the actual book, or magazine, is out, the editor’s job is simple. Champion your authors. Be relentless. Believe the thing you made is the best thing there is, not because you organized it, but because of who is in it. And then make sure everyone in the world knows. Also, when you’re claiming to have edited the best thing there is—try to be right. It helps. An editor’s job is not to be modest. An author should ideally display some modesty, or at least restraint, but if as an editor you pull that same sheepish “not a big deal” attitude, you’re really betraying all of the people who gave you their work and trusted you with it. If you don’t have absolute conviction in the work you’ve published, then you should have published better work. And if you do, then you need to say so. People are counting on you.

JUSTIN TAYLOR

Once the actual book, or magazine, is out, the editor’s job is simple. Champion your authors. Be relentless. Believe the thing you made is the best thing there is, not because you organized it, but because of who is in it. And then make sure everyone in the world knows. Also, when you’re claiming to have edited the best thing there is—try to be right. It helps. An editor’s job is not to be modest. An author should ideally display some modesty, or at least restraint, but if as an editor you pull that same sheepish “not a big deal” attitude, you’re really betraying all of the people who gave you their work and trusted you with it. If you don’t have absolute conviction in the work you’ve published, then you should have published better work. And if you do, then you need to say so. People are counting on you.