Category Archives: Reviews

When We’re All Roses of Possession: A Review of Susan Scarf Merrell’s 'Shirley'

There’s a difference between love and possession, isn’t there? In love, we’re comfortable with the people in our lives, we know our minds and hearts, and we’re in control. But what of the excitement inherent in being possessed, that ridden

When We’re All Roses of Possession: A Review of Susan Scarf Merrell’s 'Shirley'

There’s a difference between love and possession, isn’t there? In love, we’re comfortable with the people in our lives, we know our minds and hearts, and we’re in control. But what of the excitement inherent in being possessed, that ridden

Alexi Zentner's 'The Lobster Kings'

As a kid growing up in Maine, there came a day early on in the summer each year when the couch on our back porch beckoned just so, and I’d stretch out to read. At last, it was warm enough

Alexi Zentner's 'The Lobster Kings'

As a kid growing up in Maine, there came a day early on in the summer each year when the couch on our back porch beckoned just so, and I’d stretch out to read. At last, it was warm enough

God Is In the Details: Paul Rome’s 'We All Sleep in the Same Room'

Near the end of Paul Rome’s debut novel We All Sleep in the Same Room, his protagonist (a dedicated fortysomething Manhattan labor lawyer) takes his son into a Park Avenue furniture boutique. The store is divided into rooms, like an

God Is In the Details: Paul Rome’s 'We All Sleep in the Same Room'

Near the end of Paul Rome’s debut novel We All Sleep in the Same Room, his protagonist (a dedicated fortysomething Manhattan labor lawyer) takes his son into a Park Avenue furniture boutique. The store is divided into rooms, like an

For Today I Am a Boy

Our narrator, Peter Huang, is truly lost—marginal, adrift, and excruciatingly at odds with his surroundings, including his own skin. His anatomy is what he can’t escape: “There was a deep-down, physical ache…that thing, that thing I loathed, was always there. I had to use it and look at it every day.”

For Today I Am a Boy

Our narrator, Peter Huang, is truly lost—marginal, adrift, and excruciatingly at odds with his surroundings, including his own skin. His anatomy is what he can’t escape: “There was a deep-down, physical ache…that thing, that thing I loathed, was always there. I had to use it and look at it every day.”

Elizabeth Is Missing

Elizabeth Is Missing could have began as a bet Emma Healey made with herself, a challenge: Is it possible to write a mystery novel with a narrator who can’t recall its events? Maud, the elderly protagonist, has dementia so serious

Elizabeth Is Missing

Elizabeth Is Missing could have began as a bet Emma Healey made with herself, a challenge: Is it possible to write a mystery novel with a narrator who can’t recall its events? Maud, the elderly protagonist, has dementia so serious